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Webmaster & SEO Blog, Tips & Latest News

January 6, 2018

Two AdWords features you should be using

AdWords is a complicated product, and different markets use the network in different ways. Also, Google is constantly updating the service with new features, and it takes a lot of time just to keep up with new developments. Unfortunately, this also means that there are killer features that can slip by. Here are two features that likely flew under the radar:

Ad variations

As marketers, we all like to A/B test different aspects of our ads but don’t have the time to create campaigns and compare. A few months ago, Google introduced the Ad variations product, and now you can specify different variations to different parts of your ad copy and see the results at scale. It will save you a lot of time, and you get a nice report from Google at the end of the test.

Gmail ads

The drive to advertise on Gmail went down significantly after Google moves the ads to the Promotions tab. However, Gmail ads are both attractive and engaging and failing to take advantage of this channel lose the potential context that email offers. Also, users go to the Promotions tab to see email newsletters and updates and will see the ads in the same light.

There are many more features like the two above that might either save time or increase potential ad clicks. The best method is to look what you want in a campaign and see if that feature exists. Also, there are certifications in AdWords which should also surface interesting tactics and tools.

Filed under Internet, Marketing by on .

November 11, 2017

Why you should still get no-follow links

Every webmaster dreads seeing the “rel=nofollow” tag when they get a link. They believe there is no value from the link. Also, they tend to ignore websites and publications that have the policy to use no-follow for all external links. However, there is evidence that no-follow links provide benefits regarding SEO and traffic.

Brand

Rather than ignore sites which provide no-follow links outright, look for those that will provide exposure for the brand in the right market. All you need is one no-follow link from a top-tier publisher to see the difference. For example. A link from Buzzfeed can increase your organic traffic, referral traffic, social shares, and even sales. It can be hard to get links from sites like Buzzfeed, but every niche has top-tier publishers looking for content and stories.

Outreach

Also, sites that have no-follow links are more open to working with sites on articles because they know its not for link-building. You can make sites with no-follow link policies a part of your outreach efforts. People look down on spam and link-building so much that they openly welcome anyone that wants to work together without the benefit of that link equity.

Follow

There is another reason that you should look for no-follow links, and that is Google. The official statement from Google on no-follow links is “In general, we don’t follow them.”. The statement implies that in some cases, which they do not explicitly state anywhere, that they do follow and provide link equity from external links.

 

Filed under SEO by on .

October 7, 2017

Basic elements every blog should have

A blog is now a common part of every major website. Blogs used to be the domain of the lone writer or the personal diary. Now they are an integral part of any marketing strategy. The popularity of inbound marketing has seen every major brand launch or introduce a blog. Regardless of size, each and every blog should have a few important elements, here are a few of them:

Breadcrumbs

The Breadcrumbs display at the top of the page shows where the current page falls in the hierarchy of the site’s content. The first levels before the current page could be other pages or categories. Either way, it gives the user a sense of where they are. It is also one of the easiest elements to add. On some themes, it is a single option.

Categories

A list of categories on the sidebar is another important element. These categories are another form of navigation. A visitor can browse through the entire history of the site’s posts in a particular category until they find something of interest. Too many websites categorize posts, only to bury that category link somewhere on the page.

Search

Too many blogs have no search bar or one that does not work very well. When it does work, the results lack formatting, cannot be filtered by category or not descriptive enough. Some sites have simply pointed to Google Site Search instead. A good site-wide or blog-wide search is very important and is common point location for high bounce rates.

Filed under Blogging by on .

August 14, 2017

Which is better? Site optimization or traffic optimization?

Marketers often have limited budgets and resources and need to decide where that money goes. The two most common options are to optimize the site and increase conversions or optimizing traffic and bring higher quality traffic. If you can’t afford to do both, which way do you go?

Of course, we know that there is no “one size fits all” answer for everyone. Every business unique, even those operating in the same category.

Site optimization is also known as Conversion rate optimization and is the process of making changes to your website and measuring the corresponding conversion rate. The changes are not blind, and you should base them on an understanding of the average user. The typical changes involve design, flow, navigation, and content.

Traffic optimization is tweaking ad campaigns with the goal of eliminating wasted ad spend to decrease the cost per conversion. For example, a 20% reduction in low-quality clicks can reduce the cost per conversion by as much as 40%.

So which is it? Looking at real-world tests run by various marketing firms, the answer is: it depends. If you are confident that your ad campaign is optimized and only high-quality traffic gets to your site, then using CRO should see massive returns. However, there is no point optimizing a site if the majority of your traffic is of poor quality and would not convert anyway.

 

Filed under Web Development & Hosting by on .

May 5, 2017

Common mistakes companies make with their mobile presence

We are rapidly moving towards a mobile-first world, and companies understand the need for a mobile presence. Unfortunately, although they end up with a mobile presence, they end up getting it wrong. Here are some of the common mistakes you should avoid:

Mobile app

Do not assume that your company’s path to mobile users is through an app. The list of most downloaded apps only included two apps that were not social, games or content distribution. It is better to build a great web presence rather than an app that nobody will use.

Experiences

When creating a mobile experience, ensure that it is different than your desktop experience. Most websites have a responsive layout that serves them the same content in both screen sizes. Users have very different needs when browsing the same resource on a computer versus a mobile device.

Content

Desktop web experiences have additional content like infographics and downloadable Pdf files. DO not present this content as-is to mobile users. You should resize the infographics, so they fit on a mobile screen or create one for mobile users such that it still serves its purpose.

Tablets

Another issue is that companies forget that mobile users include tablet users in addition to smartphone users. The tablet form factor presents opportunities and challenges.

Local

Probably the most egregious issue by companies is ignoring local optimization for your content and mobile experience. Avoid a one-size-fits-all for content and localize for each area and region that you operate.

Filed under Mobile by on .

April 8, 2017

Google: it is unlikely mobile-first index will launch by the end of the year

phone in hands with business tags

Article written by : Internet Marketing Showtime

In November 2016 Google launched their first experiment with a mobile-first index. While there was no announcement, comments from Googler’s on the mobile-first index team indicated that they expect the launch to be towards the tail end of 2017. However, that does seem unlikely to happen now. At the Next10x conference, Garry Illyes from Google said: “that’s unlikely to happen, at least fully.”

The mobile-first index is the same Google index optimized entirely for mobile devices. With this index, Google will only index content for mobile devices and rank them accordingly. This way, a search on a mobile device is likely to be more context relevant. This index is supposedly going to use mobile metrics more heavily. Mobile design, responsiveness, page load speeds and navigation will all play a part. Sites that do not have a mobile site will see their desktop site ranked the same as before. However, there is a chance that sites with mobile content will rank higher.

This change had a lot of companies, webmasters and optimizers worried. Fortunately, with this delay, anyone who has not setup a mobile version of the website or has a re-design in the works has more time to complete the implementation.

With the majority of search traffic coming from mobile devices, a change in the index that so heavily favors mobile content could mean big changes to rankings.

Filed under digital marketing, SEO by on .

March 3, 2017

The top server side scripting languages

Article written by : Quadra Design

There are two types of websites: static and dynamic. Static websites do not change, and the best example is the typical corporate website. The website is mostly text and images with a contact form.
Dyna
mic sites are like applications; examples would be sites like Facebook, Gmail. Anything that generates something different based on user input. These dynamic websites run on a scripting language which fetches data from a database and displays it to the user. Here are the most popular server-side languages used today:

PHP

PHP is a general-purpose server-side scripting language that at the time of writing is used by three-quarters of websites running today. PHP is open source which is the primary reason for its popularity. There is a huge online community that supports and helps continue development. PHP is mostly used by smaller websites, but the largest footprint is from WordPress sites.

Java

PHP runs mostly smaller lower-traffic websites. On the other end of the spectrum, there is Java, which runs most of the high-traffic, high-performance sites. The two most notable examples of Java use for large scale websites would be Apple and Amazon, which both use Java web frameworks.

Python

Python is not as popular as PHP and Java but also runs some popular websites like Yahoo Maps, Shopzilla, and even the National Weather Service. It is a high-level language, which is meant to produce code is that more readable. This is possible thanks to a larger library of pre-existing functions that programmers can use for development.

Filed under Web Development & Hosting, Webmaster by on .